Edgar Wright, the writer and director of Baby Driver, says music inspired his movie.

So we asked him to list his five favourite film scores of all time.

Music editor Simon Collins and film and arts editor Annelies Gartner followed suit and tackled the almost impossible task of narrowing down their top five.

EDGAR WRIGHT: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966); 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968); The Blues Brothers (1980); An American Werewolf in London (1981); Reservoir Dogs (1992).

SIMON COLLINS:

Saturday Night Fever (1977)

The Bee Gees were crowned disco kings thanks to one of the highest-selling soundtracks of all time, which featured their hits Stayin’ Alive, Night Fever, Jive Talkin’ and You Should Be Dancing. More grooves courtesy of KC and the Sunshine Band, Kool and the Gang, Tavares and David Shire — plus Walter Murphy’s A Fifth of Beethoven — led to Boogie Nights 20 years later and ensured Saturday Night Fever still infects dance floors.

John Travolta in the film Saturday Night Fever.

The Blues Brothers (1980)

Jake and Elwood Blues were my unlikely getaway drivers to great soul music thanks to the cult comedy crime-caper’s soundtrack. Appearances from Aretha Franklin, James Brown and Ray Charles shook a tail feather alongside fun covers from the Blues Brothers Band, which featured members of Booker T. and the MG’s and Isaac Hayes’ band, backing music-obsessed comedians John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd.

Reservoir Dogs (1992)

Two years before Quentin Tarantino launched Urge Overkill and rekindled interest in Dusty Springfield and Dick Dale with Pulp Fiction, he created his blueprint of film dialogue and lost classics via fictional radio station K-Billy’s Super Sounds of the Seventies Weekend. Highlights include the George Baker Selection’s Little Green Bag, Blue Swede’s Hooked on a Feeling and Stealers Wheel’s ear-slicing chestnut Stuck in the Middle With You.

Steve Buscemi and Harvey Keitel in Reservoir Dogs.

The Virgin Suicides (1999)

French electronic duo Air perfectly captured the dreamy vibe of Sofia Coppola’s suburban drama with their score for the 1999 film. In fact, they managed to create songs, such as Playground Love and Highschool Lover, which work within the film and on their own. Coppola followed this with another ripper soundtrack for Lost in Translation.

24 Hour Party People (2002)

Director Michael Winterbottom’s brilliantly postmodern comedy about Factory Records and the Manchester music scene from punk to techno came with a great soundtrack, featuring Sex Pistols, Joy Division, Happy Mondays, New Order, Buzzcocks and the Clash.

ANNELIES GARTNER

Easy Rider (1969)

Peter Fonda, Dennis Hopper and Jack Nicholson hit the road to the sounds of the 60s. Steppenwolf’s Born to be Wild epitomised the bikers’ trip from Los Angeles to New Orleans. The use of rock music on a soundtrack was groundbreaking for its time and highlights include Jimi Hendrix’s If 6 Was 9 and the Byrds’ Wasn’t Born to Follow.

The Big Chill (1983)

The Rolling Stones’ You Can’t Always Get What You Want was the opening song in this film about seven former college friends who reunite for a funeral. The track didn’t make it on to the original soundtrack but Marvin Gaye, the Temptations, Aretha Franklin and Three Dog Night were a few who made a memorable score.

Reality Bites (1994)

A study of Generation X grappling to come to terms with life after college unravelled to tunes from New Order, U2, World Part, the Knack and Crowded House. Like the soundtrack to writer John Hughes’ films The Breakfast Club and Pretty in Pink, the music moved to the beat of a bunch of young adults trying to find their path in the world.

Romeo + Juliet (1996)

Baz Luhrmann’s modern adaptation of William Shakepeare’s tale of star-crossed lovers was hip in every way. Costumes and set designs popped with colour and a soundtrack that features two versions of Kym Mazelle’s Young Hearts Run Free as well as songs from Garbage, Everclear, Butthole Surfers and Radiohead.

Guardians of the Galaxy (2014)

When Peter Quill slips on the headphones and pushes play on his Walkman this film goes into orbit. Quill’s mixtape was the first soundtrack of previously released songs to top the Billboard 200 chart. Highlights include Blue Swede’s Hooked on a Feeling, David Bowie’s Moonage Daydream, 10cc’s I’m Not in Love and the Runaways’ Cherry Bomb.