Concerns have been raised after people were seen climbing on the rocks at Deep Gorge in Murujuga National Park despite signs warning of the risk of falling rocks.

People climbing on the rocks is not an unusual occurrence but they do so at a risk to both themselves and the rock art in the area.

Murujuga Aboriginal Corporation chief executive Peter Jeffries said it was not the first time rangers had witnessed people climbing over the rock art.

“The rock art is intrinsically linked to our culture, and we ask that people respect that by not climbing the rocks,” he said.

“Some of these images date back more than 30,000 years, and we want to make sure this part of our culture is preserved for generations to come.”

It is not just culturally inappropriate to climb on the rock art, but it also potentially dangerous with a rockfall in Deep Gorge not long ago prompting the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions to put up signs warning people of the risks.

DBCA Pilbara regional leader Ray De Jong said the specific rock-fall risk sign was installed over the past few months, as was the welcome sign that met all visitors to this site and made note of the risk and directed people to stay on the paths.

MAC still encouraged people to see the Murujuga rock art but urged them to stick to the desig-nated paths.